Norse Romanticism

A collection of Old Norse imagery in English literature and art in the 18th and 19th century and British travels in Nordic countries.

fleurdulys:

Funeral of a Viking - Frank Dicksee
1893

fleurdulys:

Funeral of a Viking - Frank Dicksee

1893

Journal of a Tour in Iceland in the Summer of 1809

Journal of a Tour in Iceland in the Summer of 1809

 By Sir William Jackson Hooker

Columbia University Germanic Studies

The Old Norse Element in Swedish Romanticism

Mentions the entire Northern area of the European continent in some form. Makes connections between Ossianic bards and Norse figures.

The gods of the North, an epic poem, tr. [from Nordens Guder] into Engl. verse by W.E. Frye

Character *Starkodder, may be the “Starkother” Felicia Hemans refers to in “The Sword of the Tomb: A Northern Legend”

Ossian in Painting by Henry Okun

"In Scandinavia and Germany the Celtic nature of the setting was ignored or not understood, and Ossian was regarded as a Nordic or Germanic figure who became a symbol for nationalist aspirations."

(Source: Wikipedia)

Romantic Ballads

ROMANTIC BALLADS,
TRANSLATED FROM THE DANISH;
AND
MISCELLANEOUS PIECES;

The ballads in this volume are translated from the Works of Oehlenslæger, (a poet who is yet living, and who stands high in the estimation of his countrymen,) and from the Kiæmpé Viser, a collection of old songs, celebrating the actions of the ancient heroes of Scandinavia.

Travels in 19th Century Iceland: Home page

groovyhummus:

Edward Robert Hughes
The Valkeryrie’s Vigil

groovyhummus:

Edward Robert Hughes

The Valkeryrie’s Vigil

Grímur Jónsson Thorkelin

In 1786 he travelled to England in order to search for documents relating to mediaeval Danish-English contacts. In 1787 he hired British Museum employee James Matthews [1] to transcribe the sole extant manuscript of the Old English epic poem Beowulf and made another copy himself. Under a commission from the Danish government, Thorkelin had prepared Beowulf for publication by 1807. Unfortunately during the Battle of Copenhagen (1807) his house was burned, and the manuscript of his edition (the work of 20 years) was lost. The two transcripts survived, however, and Thorkelin began all over again. The poem was eventually published in 1815. [2] Thorkelin was also the first scholar to make a full translation of the poem.

The Thorkelín transcriptions are now an important textual source for Beowulf, as the original manuscript’s margins have suffered from deterioration during the 19th and 20th centuries. His early copies provide a record in many areas where the text would otherwise be lost forever.

Thorkelín is generally regarded as one of the pioneering figures in Nordic and Germanic studies. Moreover, his visit to Britain reinvigorated interest and appreciation in the island’s Germanic past, in ways both scholarly and Romantic. However, this view is not without its detractors; Magnús Fjalldal describes Thorkelín as “essentially a fraud as a scholar” and lists a number of errors in Thorkelín’s edition and translation, many of which were pointed out by contemporary reviewers.[3]

Part One: Thorkelin’s Discovery of Beowulf

Catherine Grace Godwin

British Women Romantic Poets Project

The Wanderer’s Legacy; a Collection of Poems, on Various Subjects : electronic version.

Godwin, Catharine Grace, 1798-1845.

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